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High School

2016-2017 Course Catalog

English 4 credits for graduation

ID
Course
Grades
Description
1102 English I 9
Students explore literature, develop their vocabulary, write a research paper, and continue to strengthen their grammar skills and reading comprehension.
1104 English I Honors 9
In addition to the basic English I requirements, students in the English I Honors level class will begin to develop their voice as creative writers and be responsible for pre-AP style reading and writing assignments. Approval required.*
2102 English II 10
Students in English II will continue to study Language, Composition, and World Literature.
2104 English II Honors 10
In addition to the concepts taught in English I, English II Honors students will study various novels in-depth. A commitment to outside reading is required. Approval required.*
3102 English III 11
Students in English III will discover selected American writers with the objective of better understanding the process of how American literature has evolved over history. In addition to textbook literature, students will be reading novels. Emphasis will also be placed on writing essays and research papers.
3108 AP English Literature and Composition 11
The AP English Language and Composition course engages scholars in the careful reading and critical analysis of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts. The primary focus of the course is to develop scholars’ ability to identify and explain an author’s use of rhetorical techniques and strategies. This course includes intensive study of representative works from various disciplines and historical periods, concentrating on nonfiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text. Scholars entering the course should expect a rigorous reading schedule accompanied by thoughtful discussion and writing. As writers, scholars will focus on developing evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing, as well as effective use of rhetorical techniques and strategies. The course will consist of timed, on-demand writing as well as thoroughly revised, in-depth essays and research papers. All coursework will be in preparation for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, which is required, with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit. Approval required.*
4102 English IV 12
Scholars in English IV will be introduced to important writers from outside the United States with a special emphasis placed on British literature. Texts will range from poetry and short stories to novels. A strong emphasis will also be placed on writing essays and research papers.
4108 AP English Literature and Composition 12
The AP English Literature and Composition course engages scholars in the careful reading and critical analysis of fiction and poetry. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Scholars entering the course should expect a rigorous reading schedule and for that reading to be accompanied by thoughtful discussion and writing. As writers, scholars will focus on using literary terms and key concepts to illuminate original insights. The course will consist of timed, on-demand writing as well as thoroughly revised, in-depth essays. All coursework will be in preparation for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam, which is required, with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit. Approval required.*

 

English Electives considered as Electives credit for graduation 

3919 Writer's Workshop 11, 12 The Writer’s Workshop course is intended to strengthen scholars’ writing skills by providing more time and instruction which is focused on writing.  Students will work closely with the instructor and with each other to improve the quality of papers, essays, and other writing assignments from their classes.  Special emphasis will be placed on each stage of the writing process for each student’s writing assignment.  (This course is a half-year, fall semester course.  Students will choose a second/spring semester course later in the fall semester.) 
 3921
 
Upperclassmen Writing Lab  11, 12 This full-year course is intended to strengthen scholars’ writing skills by providing more time and instruction which is focused on writing. Students will work closely with the instructor and with each other to improve the quality of papers, essays, and other writing assignments from their classes. Special emphasis will be placed on each stage of the writing process for each student’s writing assignment.

 

Math 4 credits for graduation

1202 Algebra I 8, 9
The Algebra I course advances middle school math and prepares students for high school mathematical courses. This course addresses algebraic manipulation of linear expressions, equations, and inequalities; systems of linear equations; and representing linear equations, including graphing, transformations, and modeling with linear functions. Scholars review operations with rational and real numbers and focus on linear relationships based on data. Problem solving skills are addressed and students apply data collected from real world situations. (If taken at the 8th grade level and successfully completed, students receive high school graduation credit for this course.)
2203 Geometry 9, 10
The Geometry course includes an in-depth analysis of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry as they relate to both abstract mathematical concepts and real-world problem situations. Students will practice investigative strategies to draw conclusions using deductive and inductive reasoning.
2204 Geometry Honors 9, 10
The Geometry Honors course provides an in-depth analysis of plane, solid, and coordinate geometry as it relates to both abstract mathematical concepts and real-world problem situations. Students will practice investigative strategies to draw conclusions, prove conjectures, and refine their deductive and inductive reasoning. Approval required.*
2201 Algebra II 10
Algebra II extends the topics covered in Algebra I and provides students with advanced skills in algebraic operations including matrix operations. This course will also cover linear and quadratic functions and relations, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, graphing, and sequences and series. The skills in this course are the final building blocks for Calculus and Statistics.
2202 Algebra II Honors 10
Algebra II Honors deepens the topics of the regular course and will prepare students for a Pre-Calculus course by covering the essentials of Trigonometry and Algebraic analysis. Approval required.*
3204 Pre-calculus 11
The Pre-calculus course is a preparatory course for college-level mathematics that will complete the study of elementary functions begun in Algebra I and Algebra II and prepare scholars for Calculus. Focus in this class will include trigonometric and circular functions and their inverses, polar coordinates, conic sections, and applications of functions. Technology will be used throughout to increase depth of understanding. Scholars who plan to major in the sciences or mathematics should consider Pre-calculus. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.
3206 Pre-calculus Honors 11
The Honors Pre-calculus course is a preparatory course for college-level mathematics that will complete the study of elementary functions begun in Algebra I and Algebra II and prepare scholars for Calculus.  Focus in this class will include trigonometric and circular functions and their inverses, polar coordinates, conic sections, and applications of functions, vectors, nonlinear systems, and limits.  Technology will be used throughout to increase depth of analysis and understanding.  Scholars who plan to major in the sciences or mathematics should consider Honors Pre-calculus.  Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra II.  Approval required.*
4202 Calculus 12
Calculus is the study of rates of change. Calculus emphasizes mathematical analysis and unifies most skills from Algebra I and II, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Pre-calculus into one discipline. This course will be broken into three major sections: Limits, Differential Calculus, and Integral Calculus. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II. Approval required.*
4208 AP Calculus AB 12
Calculus is the study of anything that changes. Calculus emphasizes mathematical analysis and unifies most skills from Algebra I and II, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Pre-calculus into one discipline. This course will be broken into three major sections: Limits, Differential Calculus, and Integral Calculus. Any scholar thinking about majoring (or minoring) in math or science in college should take this course. Prerequisite:  All coursework will be in preparation for the AP Calculus AB Exam, which is required, and with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit.. Approval required.*

 

Science 3 credits for graduation

8-sci Physical Science 8
Physical Science is a laboratory science course where students investigate the relationship between matter and energy and the interaction of molecules and compounds. Scholars explore physical science concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Hands-on activities, labs, projects, and group work are emphasized. (At Collegiate, Physical Science is taken at the 8th grade level; but upon successful completion, students receive high school graduation credit for this course.)
1302 Biology 9
The goals of the Biology course are to develop an understanding and appreciation of the nature and limits of the scientific method, the diversity of life, the interrelationships existing within this diversity, and the process of mattering cycling and energy flowing through the biosphere.
1304 Biology Honors 9
The goals for the Biology Honors course are to develop a more in-depth study of the same topics covered in Standard Biology. Approval required.*
2302 Chemistry 10
The goals for the Chemistry course are to study the nature of chemistry, properties of matter, experimental measurements, chemical nomenclature, atomic theory, electron configuration, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, acids and bases, and organic chemistry.
2304 Chemistry Honors 10
The goals for the Chemistry Honors course are to develop a more in-depth study of the same topics covered in standard Chemistry. Approval required.*
3302 Anatomy & Physiology 11, 12
This course will study the human anatomy and physiology including medical terminology, basic chemistry, cell and tissue structure of the systems of the human body.
3304 Physics 11, 12
This course will explore the topics of motion, energy, force, electricity, magnetism, optics, and thermodynamics. Students will learn these concepts primarily through physical and mathematical models as well as lab experiments. This course is recommended for students interested in science, real-world math, or a better understanding of how the world around them works.

 

Science Electives considered as Electives credits for graduation

4302 AP Biology 11, 12
The AP Biology course engages students in an exploration of living organisms and factors that drive biological processes and diversity of life. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution, cellular processes, energy and communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and interactions. Scholars planning to study science in college and scholars interested in learning more about the amazing diversity of like that exists in our world should take this course. All coursework will be in preparation for the AP Biology Exam, which is required, and with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit. Successful completion of 9th grade Biology and 10th grade Chemistry is required. Approval required.*
4304 AP Chemistry 11, 12
The AP Chemistry course engages students in an exploration of the properties and interactions of matter.  Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.  Scholars planning to study science or engineering in college and scholars interested in learning more about the stuff that our universe is made of should take this course.  All coursework will be in preparation for the AP Chemistry Exam, which is required, and with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit.  Successful completion of 9th grade Biology and 10th grade Chemistry is required.  Approval required.* 
4902 Medical Physiology I   11, 12
This course will utilize case studies to explore how the human body maintains homeostasis. Students will research new topics and use prior knowledge of human anatomy and physiology to solve medical mysteries, diagnose illnesses, and learn new physiological concepts. This course is recommended for students interested in medical fields, science research, or how the human body works.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Anatomy & Physiology. (This course is a half-year course available for one semester of 0.5 credits.)

 

Social Studies 3 credits for graduation

1402 World History 9
World History is the study of interactions and relationships between people, places, and ideas around the world. The class will focus on the period of history between the Renaissance and today.
1404 World History Honors 9
World History Honors is the study of interactions and relationships between people, places, and ideas around the world. The class will focus on the period of history between the Renaissance and today and will seek to provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to take AP World History in the future. Approval required.*
3401 U.S. History 10
The U.S. History course is a survey of the history of the United States from the colonization and settlement of America to the present through the study of our national government, events in history such as the civil war, as well as institutions and individuals in our nation’s past. Required for graduation; should be taken prior to Government & Economics.
3403 U.S. History Honors 10
Students in U.S. History Honors course will cover the basics of American history but will also delve deeper into the exploration of our country’s past and will be held to higher expectations in this class. Approval required.*
3404
3405
U.S. Government
U.S. Economics
11, 12
The U.S. Government course is a study of the principles of American government and the U.S. Constitution, while Economics is a study of fundamental economic concepts such as capitalism, supply and demand, and how economic principles affect everyday life.  Both Government and Economics are one-semester courses but are taken together as a full-year, one-credit course.  Either Government & Economics regular or honors is required for graduation.
3406
3407
U.S. Government Honors
U.S. Economics Honors
11, 12 While scholars in both the U.S. Government and Economics courses cover the basics of the U.S. Constitution as well as studying fundamental economic concepts, students in the honors section of Government and Economics will be challenged to complete additional writing assignments testing their ability to think critically and respond to class content. Either Government & Economics regular or honors is required for graduation. Approval required.*

 

Social Studies Electives considered as Electives credit for graduation

4402 International Relations 11, 12
This course will expose scholars to critical international issues and current events that are unfolding in the world around them. Scholars will then be challenged to analyze and understand the events. Students will begin by examining ideas such as national interest, sovereignty, power, and diplomacy and use these concepts to examine foreign policy issues and the interaction of nations.
4408 AP U.S. History 11, 12
Advanced Placement U.S. History is designed to provide students with an in-depth look at the cultural, political, economic, social, and ideological history of the United States from Native American civilization to the present. Scholars will sharpen their analytical skills, factual knowledge, and ability to craft historical arguments akin to those necessary for college-level U.S. History courses. All coursework will be in preparation for the AP U.S. History Exam, which is required, and with the goal of every scholar receiving college credit. Approval required.*

 

Foreign Language 2 credits for graduation

1502 Latin I 9, 10, 11, 12
The Latin I class introduces students to reading and writing in Latin, with special emphasis on the Latin roots and rules of grammar which live on in English today.
2502 Latin II 10, 11, 12
Latin II continues to build students’ knowledge of Latin grammar, Roman culture, and English vocabulary while tackling more complex readings in Latin.
3502 Latin III 11, 12
Latin III will continue to build students’ knowledge of Latin grammar, Roman culture, and English vocabulary while tackling yet more complex readings in Latin. Topics to cover include, but are not limited to: family life, fist fights, agriculture, and Greco-Roman mythology. At this level of Latin, students will be easily able to read from other texts, including the Latin Bible. A rapidly increasing Latin vocabulary will give students a great advantage for the ACT, SAT, and the rest of their academic lives.
4502 Latin IV 12
As the culmination of the Latin curriculum at Collegiate, Latin IV will immerse the student in challenging authentic Latin texts ranging from the prose of Caesar to the poetry of Virgil. In the process, students will explore the history, architecture, and culture of Rome. Because this course does not primarily involve Latin grammar, the grammar will be reviewed only incidentally, and mastery of previous material is a requirement. Placement in Latin IV is contingent upon academic performance in Latin III and the recommendation of the teacher.
1506 Spanish I 9, 10, 11, 12
In the Spanish I course, students will learn and experience the Spanish Language by “taking” adventurous trips through Central and South America, where students will become familiar with most popular sayings and engage in basic communication skills and short conversations, being exposed to the different cultures, music, foods, and much more.
2506 Spanish II 10, 11, 12
Spanish II provides the refinement of skills begun in Spanish I. Students will gain increased accuracy and the ability to understand and produce appropriate responses in high frequency situations utilizing learned materials. In addition to new vocabulary, the past tense and other useful grammatical points will be covered. As in the first course, there will be great emphasis on developing the student’s speaking ability. Students will acquire a knowledge of the geography, culture, and people of regions where Spanish is spoken and of Spanish-speakers’ contributions to North American and world cultures.
3506 Spanish III 11, 12
Students in Spanish III will continue to build upon and strengthen the language skills they acquired in Spanish II. Through the study of thematic vocabulary and more advanced grammatical structures, students will be able to imitate appropriate gestures, intonation, and common idiomatic expressions. The course continues to build on the four aspects of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students continue to expand their knowledge of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples.
4506 Spanish IV 12
Spanish IV will continue to build on grammar and vocabulary learned in previous years, while increasing exposure to the culture and arts of the Hispanic world. We will explore Spanish-language films, music, literature, and current events, as well as work to increase our conversational fluency.

 

Physical Education 1.5 credits for graduation

1602 Physical Education 9
In this physical education and wellness course, students will demonstrate a competency in basic and advanced motor skills, perform motor skills and movement patterns necessary to participate in a variety of physical activities, and perform appropriate offensive and defensive skills in a variety of individual/dual and team activities that are developmentally appropriate. Required for all 9th grade students.
2601 Health & Wellness 10, 11, 12 This semester-long course will explore human health and physiology, including the topics of nutrition, mental health, disease prevention, sexuality, and safety.  The course will provide basic background knowledge about human anatomy (how the parts of the body are arranged) and physiology (how the body works) so that students will understand the science behind healthy and unhealthy lifestyle choices.  Students will also be exposed to aerobic exercises as basic methods of yoga.  Beginning with the Class of 2019, all students will be required to complete this introduction to health course to fulfill their PE/Wellness graduation requirements.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.) 

 

Physical Education Electives considered as Electives credit for graduation

 2602
 
Strength & Conditioning  11, 12  A specific Strength & Conditioning program will be developed for each individual which will concentrate on building muscle strength and stamina for male students but will focus on muscle toning and cardiovascular conditioning for female students.

 

Personal Finance 0.5 credits for graduation

3902 Personal Finance 11
The skills learned in this course will be invaluable to students as they advance through life. Students will learn how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings. Topics include money management, spending and credit, saving and investing, managing household budgets, and understanding insurance and taxes. Required for graduation. (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.) 

 

Bible 2 credits for graduation

1704 Biblical Foundations for Ethics 9, 10, 11, 12
Students in the Biblical Foundations for Ethics course will study biblical foundations and examine how the nature and principles of Christian ethics apply to current social issues.
1705 Christian Worldview 9, 10, 11, 12
The Christian Worldview class is a Bible survey course of the New Testament through an investigation into the beliefs of the Christian world that will prepare and train scholars for real-life situations. This course will be rooted in a study of the New Testament scriptures in light of its ongoing significance and will survey the central teachings of the Christian faith.
2708 A Survey of the Early Church 10, 11, 12
This course offers an overview of the major movements, counsels, and figures in Christendom. The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the challenges facing the Early Church, the theological issues the Church addressed, and many of the major historical figures of the Church from the time of Paul leading through the Protestant Reformation.
2710 Biblical Biographies: A Study of People in the Bible 10, 11, 12 “What do I have in common with King David?” This course is a study of biographies of both men and women of the Bible with modern life application. Throughout this year-long course, scholars will study many biblical characters and how God used them for greatness. Upon study, scholars will then make connections with their own life choices.

 

Fine Arts 1 credit for graduation

1802 Concert Choir 9, 10, 11, 12
Students taking Concert Choir will be provided an opportunity to develop their musical potential by learning technical skills as well as developing their rehearsal and performance abilities. After-school practices are required in order to be in concert choir and will conflict with athletic activities. A grading contract / rubric / commitment form will be signed at the beginning of the year which will include grade determination based on in-class activities as well as after-school rehearsals. All students will learn repertoire on state and national standard levels. Also, all students will participate in All-West solo and ensemble competition.
1803
2803
3803
4803
Piano I
Piano II
Piano III
Piano IV
9, 10, 11, 12
Students enrolled in this course as beginning piano scholars will be provided an opportunity to develop basic piano skills and will also be able to produce musicality through style, dynamic control, tempo variation, and phrasing while performing a varied repertoire of music. Students who are continuing from the beginner level class will be using supplemental work as well as completing the book begun in the previous class. Music from diverse genres will be introduced to students. All students will have to complete two successful student recitals for the year. Some after-school rehearsals will be required.
1805 General Music 9, 10, 11, 12 In general music, students will be given the opportunity to discover, engage, and delve deeper into music in a variety of aspects.  Scholars will learn how to read, write, and compose basic melodies using technical musical skills.  All students will have the opportunity to explore various percussion, pitched, and non-pitched instruments individually and in an ensemble setting.  Scholars will also learn how to critique, evaluate, and assess music performance.  All skills learned are highly valuable for both beginner and more advanced musicians.  (This half-year, one-semester course must be taken in the same academic year as 1807 Music in Culture and History in order to satisfy the Fine Arts graduation requirement of 1.0 credits.) 
1807 Music in Culture and History 9, 10, 11, 12 In this course, scholars will explore the role that music plays in various cultures and points in history.  Scholars will develop an understanding of the music of different cultures, genres, and styles as we learn how to listen, analyze, and gain an appreciation for music.  (This half-year, one-semester course must be taken in the same academic year as 1805 General Music in order to satisfy the Fine Arts graduation requirement of 1.0 credits.)
1806 Art I 9, 10, 11, 12
The Art I course is an introduction to basic design and will enhance the student’s interest, appreciation, and understanding of the fundamental elements of style and design. Students will study artists related to the creative process and will include a heavy emphasis on art history.
2806 Art II 10, 11, 12
The Art II course is an extension of Art I and will refine skills in basic design, as well as further develop the student’s interest, appreciation, and understanding of the fundamental elements of style and design. Students will study artists and periods of art history related to the creative process in the classroom. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I.
3807 Art III & Art IV 11, 12
Students in Art III and IV will continue to be exposed to a wide range of media, along with multiple uses and combinations while they develop a personal concentration within their work. The development of original ideas and communicating those ideas visually will be emphasized. Students will create a portfolio of work featuring three areas of study: drawing, 2-D design, and 3-D design. The class will analyze how cultures past and present reflect and relate to works of art. Students will examine why artists create and how art can make statements and create controversy. Now that basic skills have been refined, students will focus on the conceptual side of art. Prerequisite: Success completion of Art II for Art III; successful completion of Art III for Art IV.

 

Fine Arts Electives considered as Electives credit for graduation

2805 Photography 10, 11, 12
This course provides an introduction to digital photography as an artistic medium.  Students will learn basic camera handling, how to compose an aesthetically pleasing image, and how to utilize various camera functions and modes.  Image capture, rather than manipulation, will be the focus as a means of communication through compositional framing, lighting, and the use of the elements of art and principles of design.  Students will describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate photographs of their own as well as historically significant images.  Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Fine Arts graduation requirement.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.) 
3805 Photography II 10, 11, 12
In the Photography II course, scholars will utilize their knowledge and skills of image capturing from digital photography to produce images for computer editing and manipulation. Techniques include working in layers, adjusting color and contrast, sharpening, selecting, retouching, and applying filters. This course will focus on editing single images and creating composite images to be analyzed and interpreted as works of art. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography I.
3808 Public Speaking 11, 12
This course provides students with a foundation for developing oral communication skills in order to express themselves clearly and succinctly.  Students practice communicating ideas competently in both formal and informal speaking situations.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.)  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to receive three college credit hours for SAT 110 Public Speaking and Communications through Bethel University.  To receive college credit hours, students must complete all admissions, applications, and scholarship requirements.  Approval required.*

 

Electives 3 credits for graduation (College & Career Prep as well as Senior Seminar are required courses for all Collegiate Scholars.)

2909 Yearbook Lab 10, 11, 12
The Yearbook Lab is an elective course open to all high school students. This full-year class will offer opportunities to explore multiple aspects of journalism such as literary composition, photographic composition, and graphic art and design. Skills developed in these areas will culminate in the final project of designing and preparing the Collegiate yearbook.
2902 College & Career Preparation 11
The College & Career Preparation course is designed to jump-start Collegiate high school scholars into planning for their post-high school educational and career paths.  The class will include discussion, research, lecture, conferencing, group work, individual work, and presentations on colleges and careers.  Scholars will practice test-taking strategies for college entrance exams and be taken step-by-step through the admissions and financial aid processes of applying for college.  All scholars should plan to take College & Career Preparation in their 11th grade year.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.) 
2906 Exploring Computer Science 10, 11, 12 Exploring Computer Science is designed for scholars interested in an in-depth survey of computer hardware, software development, and web site design.  This course is a rigorous, rewarding, and fun learning experience for scholars who have an interest in modern technology.  All scholars interested in pursuing a promising career in math, physics, computer science, or engineering should register for this course.  (This course is a half-year, fall semester course.  Students will choose a second/spring semester course later in the fall semester.) 
3901 Graphical Programming with Robotics I 10, 11, 12
This full-year course provides scholars with an unintimidating immersion into computer programming by interfacing the industry-standard LabVIEW graphical development environment with the LEGO® robotics platform. Participants will be challenged to develop problem-solving skills in a creative atmosphere emphasizing both mechanical and software design. All scholars interested in pursuing a promising career in math, physics, computer science, or engineering should register for this course.
3904 Culinary Arts 11, 12
Culinary Arts is a course designed to help students understand the nutrient value, appetite appeal, social significance, and cultural aspects of food.  Students will examine the role of nutrition as it relates to food necessary to live a healthy life.  The course offers students opportunities to develop basic life skills in the safe and sanitary selection, preparation, storing, and serving of food within the optimal use of food resources.  This course is designed to be a rewarding and challenging experience for students who have an interest in the culinary arts.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.) 
3910 Introduction to Business 11, 12
Introduction to Business is a survey course designed to provide an overview of the principles and functions of business in today’s society.  The course will provide a foundation for college-level business courses.  Topics of study include accounting/finance, business law, economic systems, entrepreneurship, marketing, management, operations, personnel, and technology.  Business-related current events, biblical perspectives, and workplace issues will be discussed.  Students will also be exposed to various careers in business.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.)  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to receive three college credit hours for BUS 103, Fundamentals of Business through Christian Brothers University, Business Administration.  To receive college credit hours, students must complete all admissions, applications, and scholarship requirements.  Approval required.*
3916 Introduction to Psychology 11, 12 This course explores the study of human behavior and its basic concepts, theories, research methods, and contributions to the understanding of human behavior.  Topics include the nervous system, perception, motivation, learning and memory, social behavior, personality, and developmental psychology.  (This course is a half-year course available for one semester or 0.5 credits.)  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to receive three college credit hours for PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology through Bethel University.  To receive college credit hours, students must complete all admissions, applications, and scholarship requirements.  Approval required.* 
4901 Graphical Programming with Robotics II 11, 12 This full-year course is a continuation of the Graphical Programming with Robotics course.  Students will develop skills in mechanical design and construction as they work in teams to build simple and complex robotic devices.  We will explore the usage of robotics in modern business and industry and examine how robotic devices are affecting our lives and shaping our culture.  Students will apply concepts learned in physical science and physics classes to mechanical devices.  Prerequisite:  Graphical Programming with Robotics I. 
4904 Senior Seminar 12
Senior Seminar is a required class for all Collegiate seniors. This full-year class is an applied preparatory class that monitors progress, facilitates success, and provides assistance and educational support to seniors for college admissions and financial aid.
*Approval required -- Approval for honors level or advanced placement courses is based on previous grade average, recommendation of Director of Student Achievement and current teacher, and standardized test scores.